A message from the Mayor’s Office

Mayor Troy Rudder is announcing that out of respect for our employees and respect for the general public, and with guidance from both State and Federal governments, the City of London asks that customers use the drive-through at both City Hall and the London Utility Commission.

The Police, and Fire Departments along with the Community Center have glass partitions for your safety and ours. All business transactions including building permits and business licenses can be made by using our drive-up window. For other matters, call us at 864-4169.

Stay strong, stay aware and stay safe.

London Police Officers Receive Award of Valor

London Police officers received the Award of Valor during Monday’s City Council meeting. The awards were presented in reference to acts of valor on 10.1.19 when officers went above and beyond with disregard to their own safety to protect the lives of others. Their acts resulted in the arrest of an armed wanted subject.

Those who received the award include: Chief Darrel Kilburn, Captain Randy Medlock, Corporal Troy Truett, Ofc. Cody Faulconer, and Ofc. Ashley Taylor. Members of the Laurel Co. Sheriff’s Office were also recognized for their support and actions.

New Year’s Eve Extravaganza

The City of London rang in the new decade with its second annual New Year’s Eve Extravaganza Tuesday night, featuring the Pink Cadillac band from Nashville and DJ Larry Lee to keep the festivities hopping until the ball dropped at midnight.

The event had something for all ages. Youngsters danced to the music. Middle-aged folk reminisced with many of their friends who came in from out of town. While older people stayed up past their bedtimes and kept warm inside the heated tent to welcome in the new year.

Everyone had a good time and it capped a great 2019 for the City of London.

2019 Community Clean Up Day

More than 60 volunteers participated Saturday morning in the 2019 Community Clean Up Day in downtown London. Dozens of bags of trash were removed to help London look its best during the World Chicken Festival next week.

Non-profit groups competed for prizes for the number of participants in each group and the total bags of litter collected. Each volunteer also received a free pass to Treetop Adventure.

Thanks to everyone who made the Clean Up Day a great success. Also, thanks to First National Bank of Manchester, Daniel Carmack of Sallie Davidson Realtors and Todd Strouse- Edward Jones Investments for their generous prize donations.

College Park Dr. Pond Drains

The apparent failure of an overflow pipe caused the large pond at Somerset Community College to drain almost completely away overnight Wednesday, Aug. 28th. The water started draining following a hard rain after midnight, and had disappeared by 6:30 a.m. on Aug. 28th.

Loss of the large volume of water also caused the side of the main road leading to the London-Laurel Wellness Park to give way, prompting officials to close the road until the situation is assessed. After initially believing the park could stay open via a detour, SCC officials informed London Parks and Recreation Director Mackie Williams that they were concerned about the stability of the area, and asked that the Wellness Park be closed through the Labor Day weekend.

The pond and the drainage system were built decades ago when the property was a depot for coal coming in from Eastern Kentucky. Four large heavy equipment tires were uncovered in the bottom of the pond. London and Laurel County purchased the property and later deeded portions, including the road, to Somerset Community College.

Williams said he inspected below the Wellness Park where the drain pipe exits to make sure there was no flood damage from the millions of gallons of water sucked out of the pond. “I went all the way down to the railroad track and there wasn’t any damage,” he said. “There is a big culvert under the railroad track that leads to the Little Laurel River back there. The creek is huge so the water just dispersed.”

The Wellness Park off College Park Dr. re-opened on Wednesday, Sept. 4th. For safety purposes, the City is asking the public to follow the “detour” signs to the park and use caution while driving through Somerset Community College’s Laurel Campus to access the road between the ponds.

As always, be mindful of pedestrians and enjoy the park!

London Police have successful National Night Out 2019

For the fourth year in a row, the London Police Department had a successful National Night Out. National Night Out is a free family-friendly designated safe night out across America to promote awareness, safety and neighborhood unity.

Over 300 attended with over 25 community partners providing free food and giveaways. London Police held a Pinewood Derby for children and a Shop with a Cop “Pie an Officer in the Face” fundraiser. London Police collected $686 in donations for Shop with a Cop. The Kentucky Bloodmobile was in attendance, receiving 10 registered donors and seven units of blood.

Plans to complete KY 30 segment announced

Mayor Troy Rudder and Judge-Executive David Westerfield joined Governor Matt Bevin and other officials to announce plans to complete the final segment of KY 30 along the 37-mile corridor that stretches from KY 11 in Booneville to the Hal Rogers Parkway in London.

At the end of August, a contract will be awarded to straighten the 13.5-mile curvy corridor between US 421 in Jackson County to Travellers Rest in Owsley County, reducing the length by 3.5 miles. A shorter, straighter path means drive times will be cut in half from 21 minutes to 11 minutes. KY 30 is the most direct route from Lee, Jackson and Owsley Counties to I-75 south, businesses in London, western Kentucky and Tennessee.

The announcement was made at the Department of Highways garage on West Ky. 80 in London.

London Needs Residents to Recycle Smarter

After years of urging residents to recycle and establishing a successful recycling center, the City of London is now sending out a new message: We need you to be smarter about recycling.

It’s called London Recycling 2.0. And it’s a message born of necessity.

The market for recycling materials is in the dumps, so to speak, after China decided at the beginning of the year not to accept loads of waste paper, metals or plastic unless they are 99.5 percent pure.

That’s hard for the single-stream recycling centers in the U.S. to attain. Previously, all they had to do was bale the recycling materials, contaminates and all, and send them to China for sorting and processing.

Now, that job falls to recycling centers such as the London Regional Recycling Center, which has increased manpower costs significantly. To make matters worse, the glut of recycling materials has decreased revenue to the point that some municipalities have stopped recycling altogether.

London is not there yet, but it needs residents to be more careful about what they recycle, and not include contaminates such as food, clothing, dirty diapers and yard waste.

“We are losing all the way around,” said Steve Edge, London’s Public Works Director. “Misuse is the biggest thing. The more garbage they put in the more we have to pay to sort it. We’re losing a lot of recycled garbage because of contamination.”

Steep declines in revenue
The country’s major waste hauling and recycling companies—Waste Management, Republic Services and Waste Connections— have all reported steep declines in recycling revenue, some as much as 43 percent.
In London this year, the decline in recycling revenue may approach 50 percent.

The city recycled 3,957 tons in fiscal year 2016-2017 which produced revenue of $635,695. Projections for the current fiscal year which ends June 30 are for 3,136 tons, but revenue of only $257,135.

“As you can see, we are processing almost the same amount of tons, but getting about half the revenue,” Edge said.

The loss will have a significant impact on London’s budget.

“Long story short, and it’s a multitude of reasons, we’re going to be about $400,000 short,” Mayor Troy Rudder said. “It’s the economy for recycling across the world. I’ve talked to mayors who are baling it and throwing it away. They are going through the motions of recycling and then dumping it.”

London doesn’t want to go through the motions of recycling, which is why it’s asking residents to be more careful and thoughtful about what they throw in the recycling bins.

“What can we do as a group to break even?” the mayor said. “Across the nation 25 percent of all recycling has to be thrown away because of contamination from kitchen garbage.”

London Recycling 2.0
In the coming months, the city plans a major educational campaign to show residents what can be recycled correctly, and what needs to be thrown in the trash.

The campaign will include news articles, Facebook posts, videos, posters, door hangers and other materials to educate residents how to recycle smarter.

For example, most people don’t know that plastic grocery bags are not recyclable, and in fact, gum up the machinery in the recycling center. Egg cartons and foam restaurant take-out boxes are not acceptable either. Only plastic that has either a 1 or 2 on the bottom should be recycled. The rest is garbage.

“I’ll bet for six months I threw glass in the recycling can.” Mayor Rudder said. I was under the impression we can make pea gravel out of it. I okayed the information that went out on it. But it wasn’t correct.”

The recycling center accepts glass as drop-off only. Glass in the curbside cans is a danger to employees and work-release inmates who have to sort them.

Councilman Judd Weaver, who leads the street and sanitation committee, said education now is the number one priority.

“I was throwing stuff away that is not recyclable too,” he said. “If we educate people and give them a little better understanding about the recycling process, we will all be better off.”

Weaver said in the current economic conditions, the best thing for residents to remember is, “When in doubt, throw it out.”

City Receives $3,000 Matching Grant from KLC

The City of London received a $3,000 matching grant from the Kentucky League of Cities to help improve worker safety and training. London uses the grant to pay for steel toe boots for about 40 workers, as well as additional safety training.

Greg Partin, left, senior loss control consultant for KLC, presented the check to Mayor Troy Rudder and the city’s safety officer Rick Cochrane.

/* ]]> */SiteLock